Hidden Cache at Harmony Hall!


Sloatsburg resident and Friends of Harmony Hall board member Kathy Goldman set to work on including Harmony Hall - Jacob Sloat House in the fun treasure hunt called Geocaching! The Friends of Harmony Hall welcome you to take part!


There are tons of geocaches hidden around the world! Geocaching is a recreational activity where one uses a navigation system to hide and seek containers.



What to do when you've found it:

When you find the cache, sign the logbook and return it to the cache. You can take an item from the cache if you like - just make sure to leave something of equal or greater value in its place. When you are finished, put the cache back exactly as you found it, even if you think you see a better spot for it. Finally, visit the cache page to log your find and share your experience with others.Here is the link to


Here's the link to get started - https://www.geocaching.com/geocache/GC99P6D_harmony-hall

Once you're in the link above, be sure to scroll down to the "Additonal Hints"!



*** PLEASE NOTE: A FEW PARKING SPOTS ARE AVAILABLE BEHIND THE HOUSE BY THE GARAGE. HOWEVER, THE CACHE IS NOT HIDDEN ON THE HOUSE ITSELF! ALSO, THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE HOUSE IS A PRIVATE RESIDENCE FOR THE CURATOR OF HARMONY HALL, PLEASE RESPECT HIS PRIVACY. THANK YOU. ***


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A Brief history of Harmony Hall - Jacob Sloat House


Harmony Hall was built in 1848 by Jacob Sloat, grandson of Orange militia captain Stephen Sloat, who built and ran a local tavern along Orange Turnpike (Route 17) just south of Harmony Hall. Stephen's tavern hosted many early patriots including George Washington. The stately Harmony Hall mansion, which sits prominently on a hill reflects late Greek Revival and emerging Italianate styles. Jacob was an inventor, industrialist and entrepreneur. He built a mill on the east side of today's Orange Tnpk. (Rt. 17). The mill was powered by the Sloat Dam built on the Ramapo River by his father Isaac around 1792. By 1852 the Sloat Mill produced up to 8,000 pounds of cotton twine per week which was sent by Erie Railroad to the New York market. The mill supported a thriving village economy. Famed Husdon River School artist Jasper Cropsey was a friend of Jacob Sloat and was trained in architecture. Cropsey may have offered design ideas to the house.


Harmony Hall-Jacob Sloat House is listed on the National Registers of Historic Places,

Harmony Hall and the grounds are owned by the Town of Ramapo and managed by the not-for-profit group Friends of Harmony Hall-Jacob Sloat House.

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